In November 2008, I voted in my first election. I remember standing in the voting booth, filling in a bubble for the man I hoped would become President. I’ll admit it, I cried a little when I voted that first time, because my vote meant so much more than a mark on a page. It represented belief in policies that could move America forwards, not back. I voted for Barack Obama because he understands and advocates for me as a woman, a young American and an environmentalist. He has stood by those policies, and I am so proud to vote for him again. Thanks for the last four years Mr. President, and here’s to four more!

In November 2008, I voted in my first election. I remember standing in the voting booth, filling in a bubble for the man I hoped would become President. I’ll admit it, I cried a little when I voted that first time, because my vote meant so much more than a mark on a page. It represented belief in policies that could move America forwards, not back. I voted for Barack Obama because he understands and advocates for me as a woman, a young American and an environmentalist. He has stood by those policies, and I am so proud to vote for him again. Thanks for the last four years Mr. President, and here’s to four more!

Obama’s Way —Michael Lewis
Michael Lewis, author of The Big Short and Moneyball, spent six months trailing President Barack Obama. He hitched rides on Air Force One, joined Obama’s pickup basketball games and spoke with the President at length about policies, politics, and everything else.
This is one of the most honest portrayals of the President I’ve seen. Yes it’s a long read, but that’s because Lewis describes our Commander in Chief as a human being, not just a political figure. So sit down, get comfortable, and take the time to really get to know our President. 

Obama’s WayMichael Lewis

Michael Lewis, author of The Big Short and Moneyball, spent six months trailing President Barack Obama. He hitched rides on Air Force One, joined Obama’s pickup basketball games and spoke with the President at length about policies, politics, and everything else.

This is one of the most honest portrayals of the President I’ve seen. Yes it’s a long read, but that’s because Lewis describes our Commander in Chief as a human being, not just a political figure. So sit down, get comfortable, and take the time to really get to know our President. 

This is how I know we’re winning.
Team Obama on yard signs:

People close to the campaign said yard signs aren’t a priority in the campaign for president. And Democratic officials said they’re focusing on phone calls, door-to-door visits, brochures and other volunteer-heavy tactics to get out the vote.
[Obama supporter Barbara, who put a yard sign up] agreed that volunteering is more important than placing a sign, and she said she works four days a week registering voters in both parties.

Team Romey on yard signs:

In most cases, a regular Obama yard sign will cost a supporter $5 today. The local Romney campaign has been giving them away.
"They were begging us to take them, put them out, give them to our neighbors," said Lois Carter, who had two signs outside her and her husband David’s home on Riverside Drive

[Source: Daytona Beach News-Journal]

This is how I know we’re winning.

Team Obama on yard signs:

People close to the campaign said yard signs aren’t a priority in the campaign for president. And Democratic officials said they’re focusing on phone calls, door-to-door visits, brochures and other volunteer-heavy tactics to get out the vote.

[Obama supporter Barbara, who put a yard sign up] agreed that volunteering is more important than placing a sign, and she said she works four days a week registering voters in both parties.

Team Romey on yard signs:

In most cases, a regular Obama yard sign will cost a supporter $5 today. The local Romney campaign has been giving them away.

"They were begging us to take them, put them out, give them to our neighbors," said Lois Carter, who had two signs outside her and her husband David’s home on Riverside Drive

[Source: Daytona Beach News-Journal]

A comparison of Obama and Romney’s proposed changes to effective tax rates, put together by Naomi Robbins for Ezra Klein. The x-axis represents income levels in America.
Klein:

Romney’s plan is a large tax cut for the top 60 percent, a huge tax cut for the top few percent, and a significant  tax increase for the bottom few percent, as he permits a few temporary tax breaks that benefit low-income folks to expire. Obama’s plan keeps the current tax rates for almost everyone but the top few percent, who face a very large tax increase.
It’s also worth noting that these numbers only tell half the story: Romney has promised to offset the cost of most of his tax plan through spending cuts and tax reforms, and so any analysis of who pays is incomplete without those policies. But that information is impossible to graph, as Romney hasn’t released it yet. All we can say is that since Romney has promised to increase spending on defense and honor Medicare and Social Security’s scheduled benefits for the next decade, it’s hard to see how he makes good on that promise without cutting deep into programs for the poor and tax preferences that benefit the middle class, and if that’s right, then the poor and middle class are paying much more than you can tell from the graph above.

A comparison of Obama and Romney’s proposed changes to effective tax rates, put together by Naomi Robbins for Ezra Klein. The x-axis represents income levels in America.

Klein:

Romney’s plan is a large tax cut for the top 60 percent, a huge tax cut for the top few percent, and a significant  tax increase for the bottom few percent, as he permits a few temporary tax breaks that benefit low-income folks to expire. Obama’s plan keeps the current tax rates for almost everyone but the top few percent, who face a very large tax increase.

It’s also worth noting that these numbers only tell half the story: Romney has promised to offset the cost of most of his tax plan through spending cuts and tax reforms, and so any analysis of who pays is incomplete without those policies. But that information is impossible to graph, as Romney hasn’t released it yet. All we can say is that since Romney has promised to increase spending on defense and honor Medicare and Social Security’s scheduled benefits for the next decade, it’s hard to see how he makes good on that promise without cutting deep into programs for the poor and tax preferences that benefit the middle class, and if that’s right, then the poor and middle class are paying much more than you can tell from the graph above.